Venture Development Interns Pitch Technologies

Where Students Learn to Innovate

Venture Development Interns Pitch Technologies

On November 21st, the Friday of Homecoming week, most students are preparing for Saturday’s game. However, this was not the case for the Venture Development interns at The University of Alabama’s Office for Technology Transfer (OTT). Instead, these students were pitching new technologies developed at UA to external business leaders and professionals. At the beginning of the Fall 2014 semesters, the six interns were grouped into pairs comprised of one technical student and one business student. Together they were given the task of examining a new technology developed on campus at UA and determining the best method of commercialization.

 

The judges panel listening to presentations.

The judges panel listening to presentations.

The pitches were delivered to a panel of judges whose backgrounds ranged from patent attorney to business development manager. They were asked to judge the students on numerous criteria including how effectively they conveyed the concept of the technology, the problem it was solving, and the feasibility of their commercialization plan.

The interns play a vital role in the development process at OTT. It is their semester long research that helps OTT staff capitalize on technologies with high commercial potential. The internship lasts 12 weeks and each week the interns are required to present their findings to OTT staff. This experiential learning process helps the interns learn valuable skills like developing a value proposition, how to properly recognize target markets, and how to give a professional presentation.

The goal of the internship is for the interns to definitively decide on direction for their respective technology and have the necessary data to back up their conclusion. This information is collected in a commercialization report that OTT utilizes to continue efforts once the internship has ended.

The following is a short profile on each team and their technology.

Wheelchair Cushion Monitor (WCM)

Danielle and Jason of Wheelchair Cushion Monitor deliver their pitch.

Danielle and Jason of Wheelchair Cushion Monitor deliver their pitch.

Technology: If a wheelchair bound patient sits in one position for an extended amount of time, the possibility of developing a pressure ulcer increases exponentially. Pressure ulcers are very serious and can injury both the flesh and muscle on a patient. The severity of these ulcers can lead to amputation and even death. Additionally, the injuries are very costly, totaling an average of $40,000 in treatment cost. The WCM technology dynamically measures the pressure of wheelchair bound patients and alerts patients and caretakers of situations with high potential to develop a pressure ulcer.

Team Members: Danielle Toy, a junior in the MIS program, and Jason Oh, a junior in Mechanical Engineering

 

MagCap

Forrest and Max of MagCap delivering their pitch

Forrest and Max of MagCap delivering their pitch

Technology: As the alternative energy sources and electric vehicle markets grow, so will the demand for supercapacitors. Supercapacitors are used in conjunction with batteries to store energy and release it smoothly. The problem is that many supercapacitors are needed to obtain desired levels of energy storage. This diminishes the effectives of the supercapacitor. MagCap’s technology is tunable supercapacitor that could be reconfigured to hold varying amounts of energy and eliminate the need for additional supercapacitors, thereby simplifying energy storage.

Team Members: Forrest Hames, a senior in Finance, and Max Mittenthal, a junior Chemical Engineering major in the STEM-MBA program.

 

Efficient Energy Systems

Clay and Andrew of Energy Efficient Systems delivering their pitch.

Clay and Andrew of Energy Efficient Systems delivering their pitch.

Technology: Everyone wants an easy way to save money on their power bill, right? The technology of Energy Efficient Systems gives you that capability. Their technology is an algorithm that could read the price of electricity and only use power when it was cheapest. Everyone has a particular preference of temperature for their home to be when they get home from work. With the help of their algorithm, your thermostat will work to achieve this temperature by only running periodically throughout the day when electricity is the most affordable.

Team Members: Andrew Talbert, a junior Computer Engineering major in the STEM-MBA program, and Clay Kilgore, a senior in the MIS program.

For more information on any of these technologies or the Office for Technology Transfer, please feel to contact us.

On November 21st, the Friday of Homecoming week, most students are preparing for Saturday’s game. However, this was not the case for the Venture Development interns at The University of Alabama’s Office for Technology Transfer (OTT). Instead, these students were pitching new technologies developed at UA to external business leaders and professionals. At the beginning of the Fall 2014 semesters, the six interns were grouped into pairs comprised of one technical student and one business student. Together they were given the task of examining a new technology developed on campus at UA and determining the best method of commercialization.

 

The judges panel listening to presentations.

The judges panel listening to presentations.

The pitches were delivered to a panel of judges whose backgrounds ranged from patent attorney to business development manager. They were asked to judge the students on numerous criteria including how effectively they conveyed the concept of the technology, the problem it was solving, and the feasibility of their commercialization plan.

The interns play a vital role in the development process at OTT. It is their semester long research that helps OTT staff capitalize on technologies with high commercial potential. The internship lasts 12 weeks and each week the interns are required to present their findings to OTT staff. This experiential learning process helps the interns learn valuable skills like developing a value proposition, how to properly recognize target markets, and how to give a professional presentation.

The goal of the internship is for the interns to definitively decide on direction for their respective technology and have the necessary data to back up their conclusion. This information is collected in a commercialization report that OTT utilizes to continue efforts once the internship has ended.

The following is a short profile on each team and their technology.

Wheelchair Cushion Monitor (WCM)

Danielle and Jason of Wheelchair Cushion Monitor deliver their pitch.

Danielle and Jason of Wheelchair Cushion Monitor deliver their pitch.

Technology: If a wheelchair bound patient sits in one position for an extended amount of time, the possibility of developing a pressure ulcer increases exponentially. Pressure ulcers are very serious and can injury both the flesh and muscle on a patient. The severity of these ulcers can lead to amputation and even death. Additionally, the injuries are very costly, totaling an average of $40,000 in treatment cost. The WCM technology dynamically measures the pressure of wheelchair bound patients and alerts patients and caretakers of situations with high potential to develop a pressure ulcer.

Team Members: Danielle Toy, a junior in the MIS program, and Jason Oh, a junior in Mechanical Engineering

 

MagCap

Forrest and Max of MagCap delivering their pitch

Forrest and Max of MagCap delivering their pitch

Technology: As the alternative energy sources and electric vehicle markets grow, so will the demand for supercapacitors. Supercapacitors are used in conjunction with batteries to store energy and release it smoothly. The problem is that many supercapacitors are needed to obtain desired levels of energy storage. This diminishes the effectives of the supercapacitor. MagCap’s technology is tunable supercapacitor that could be reconfigured to hold varying amounts of energy and eliminate the need for additional supercapacitors, thereby simplifying energy storage.

Team Members: Forrest Hames, a senior in Finance, and Max Mittenthal, a junior Chemical Engineering major in the STEM-MBA program.

 

Efficient Energy Systems

Clay and Andrew of Energy Efficient Systems delivering their pitch.

Clay and Andrew of Energy Efficient Systems delivering their pitch.

Technology: Everyone wants an easy way to save money on their power bill, right? The technology of Energy Efficient Systems gives you that capability. Their technology is an algorithm that could read the price of electricity and only use power when it was cheapest. Everyone has a particular preference of temperature for their home to be when they get home from work. With the help of their algorithm, your thermostat will work to achieve this temperature by only running periodically throughout the day when electricity is the most affordable.

Team Members: Andrew Talbert, a junior Computer Engineering major in the STEM-MBA program, and Clay Kilgore, a senior in the MIS program.

For more information on any of these technologies or the Office for Technology Transfer, please feel to contact us.

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